Escalator renders

Here is a straight render of the escalator I built for an animation which was shown in this earlier post.

I had it built textured and rigged over the course of a weekend. I used the Cinema 4d Mograph module to duplicate the steps, and the Mograph effectors to move them and flip them appropriately as well as to keep them level as they descend.

There are definitely some imprefections here and there, which unfortuntely will happen when you are under a deadline. The blueprint style however was forgiving to any rendering blemishes or minute details that weren’t 100% accurate, so we moved on to the next object once the client signed off.

Will post more shots soon!

escalator

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The blueprint fest continues…

Here is yet another Factory Floor-related post. The industrial Potato Slicer, which takes your standard potato and tosses it one step closer towards the arterial plaque it will eventually become.

Our good friend Jason Martin modeled the slicer carousel in Lightwave I believe (the central part that spins) and was rewarded with his name adorned upon the blueprint title block. This was rendered and animated in C4D, then composited in After Effects.

Below is another, The Snow Blower, which Jason and I worked on as a tag team.
We were originally to be given a CAD model from the manufacturer, but for legal reasons we were (somewhat humorously) only given a wheel, a short section of handle bar and the red “shroud” that envelopes the machinery, meaning we had a lot of work left to do on it. We were originally told we would need to do a product “build” so most of the guts were initially built as well, but in the end, none of the animations focused on the machinery within.

We pecked away on the model over the course of a few months, only because the schedule changed regularly, frequently pushing the snowblower later and later in production, while other scenes moved to the forefront in order of priority. As mentioned in an earlier post, there were about 100 animation calls to get through, which included approximately 50 or so models to build, rig and animate. While some models may appear somewhat straight forward in terms of model complexity, the sheer amount of objects to get through forced us to prioritize when we could work on them.